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10 grams of cashews provide 55 calories, 6.7% of the daily value in total fats, 3.6% DV of protein, 1.3% DV of dietary fiber and 1.1% DV of carbohydrates. Cashews are rich sources of dietary minerals, including copper, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium, as well as thiamin, vitamin B6 and vitamin K. Iron, potassium, zinc and selenium are present in significant content.

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The oldest known archeological remains of peanut pods have been dated at about 7.600 years old. Peanuts are rich in essential nutrients. In a 100 g serving, peanuts provide 570 calories and are an excellent source of several B vitamins, vitamin E, several dietary minerals, such as manganese, magnesium and phosphorus, as well as dietary fiber. They also contain significant amounts of protein. Some studies show that regular consumption of peanuts is associated with a lower risk of mortality from certain diseases

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The almond is a nutritionally dense food and a rich source of B vitamins riboflavin, thiamine, vitamin B6 and niacin, vitamin E and the essential minerals, such as calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, zinc, folate, choline and potassium. Almonds are also rich in dietary fiber, monosaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats, which may potentially lower LDL cholesterol. Typical of nuts and seeds, almonds also contain phytosterols, such as beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, camposterol, sitostanol and campestanol, which have been associated with cholesterol-lowering properties.

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Before European settlement, pecans were widely consumed and traded by Native Americans. The seeds of the pecan are edible, with a rich, buttery flavour. In 100 g, pecans provide 691 calories and over 100% of the daily value for total fat. Pecans are a rich source of dietary fiber, manganese, magnesium (34% DV), phosphorus, zinc and thiamine. Pecans are also a good source of protein, iron and B vitamins. Their fat content consists mainly of monounsaturated fatty acids, mainly oleic acid (57% of total fat), and the polyunsaturated fatty acid – linoleic acid (30% of total fat)

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Hazelnuts are a rich source of numerous essential nutrients. Particularly in high amounts are protein, dietary fiber, vitamin E, thiamine, phosphorus, manganese and magnesium, as well several B vitamins. In lesser but still significant amounts are vitamin K, calcium, zinc and potassium. Hazelnuts are a significant source of fat, such as monounsaturated fat as oleic acid (75% of total), polyunsaturated fat mainly as linoleic acid (13% of total) and saturated fat, mainly as palmitic acid and stearic acid (together 7% of total)

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Brazil nuts are 14% protein, 12% carbohydrate, and 66% fat by weight; 85% of their calories come from fat, and a 100 g serving provides 656 total calories. Brazil nuts are an excellent source of dietary fiber and various vitamins and dietary minerals. They contain rich content of thiamin, vitamin E, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese and zinc Brazil nuts are perhaps the richest dietary source of selenium.

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Dried coconut meat is produced from mature coconuts as they have a higher percentage of meat to water and it’s thicker and denser. Mature coconuts also have a higher level of fat. This is because when the coconut becomes fully mature, the meat contains an abundance of oil. There is also a significant amount of fiber in dried meat. Unlike fresh coconut meat which has a water weight of 47%, dried meat only has 2-3%. As the percentage of water decreases, the fat content increases making dried meat a good source of fat.

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Hemp seeds are notable as a high-protein food source, Hempseed amino acid profile is comparable to other sources of protein such as meat, milk, eggs and soy. Hemp seeds are also a rich source of the dietary minerals, magnesium, zinc and iron, and a good source of dietary fiber. Approximately 73% of the energy in hemp seeds is in the form of fats and essential fatty acids

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With a wide variety of nutrients ranging from magnesium and manganese to copper, protein and zinc, pumpkin seeds are nutritional powerhouses wrapped up in a very small package. Because these are high-fiber seeds, they’re able to boost your fiber intake, helping you reach the ideal amount of 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. Pumpkin seeds have long been valued as a source of the mineral zinc, and the World Health Organization recommends their consumption as a good way of obtaining this nutrient

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Some call it one of the most powerful plant foods on the planet. Flaxseed was cultivated in Babylon as early as 3000 BC. Flax seeds are edible, with a slightly spicy flavour. In a 100 gram serving, flax seeds supply 534 calories and contain high levels of protein, dietary fiber, several B vitamins and dietary minerals. Flax seeds are especially rich in thiamine, magnesium and phosphorus. As a percentage of total fat, flax seeds contain 54% omega-3 fatty acids, 18% omega-9 fatty acids (oleic acid) and 6% omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid), as well as 9% saturated fat, including 5% as palmitic acid.

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Sunflower seeds are a nutrient-dense food. They are an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, all B vitamins and vitamin E. The seeds also contain high levels of the dietary minerals, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, iron and zinc. Sunflower seed as high in fat, mainly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, principally linoleic acid. Additionally, the seeds contain phytosterols, which may contribute toward lower levels of blood cholesterol.

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Wheat provides lots of calories and is ann excellent source multiple essential nutrients, such as protein, dietary fiber, manganese, phosphorus and niacin. Several B vitamins and other dietary minerals are in significant content. Wheat is 13% water, 71% carbohydrates, 1.5% fat and 13% protein. Wheat is the world’s most favoured staple food. Wheat is the most important source of carbohydrate in a majority of countries.

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The sixteenth-century Codex Mendoza provides evidence that chia was cultivated by the Aztec in pre-Columbian times; economic historians have suggested it was as important as maize as a food crop. Chia seeds are a rich source of the B group vitamins, thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, folate, and such dietary minerals as calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc.

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The poppy seed is mentioned in ancient medical texts from many civilizations, such as Sumerians. They have long been used as a folk remedy to aid sleeping and promote fertility. Poppy seed is a nutritionally dense spice with high levels of essential minerals calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. Poppy seeds are highly nutritious and less allergenic than many other seeds and nuts. Poppy seeds are a potential source of anti-cancer drugs.

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Rye is a good source of fiber, which is richly endowed with noncellulose polysaccharides, which have exceptionally high water-binding capacity and quickly give a feeling a fullness and satiety, making rye a real help for anyone trying to lose weight. Rye is high in gliadin and low in glutenin. A very good source of phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamin B1, a great characteristic of rye is that is has a 4:1 ratio of magnesium to calcium. Rye has the ability to encourage the production of butyric acid, a fatty acid required for a healthy colon. Studies also show that butyric acids can cause cancer cells to turn into normal cells.

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Sesame seed is one of the oldest oilseed crops known, domesticated well over 3000 years ago. Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed. With a rich, nutty flavour, it is a common ingredient in cuisines across the world. Sesame seeds are rich in calories, providing an excellent source of essential nutrients as parts of the daily value. While containing high amounts of protein, dietary fiber and total fat (mainly as linoleic acid and oleic acid), sesame seeds are also particularly rich in B vitamins and the dietary minerals manganese, magnesium, calcium, iron and zinc.

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Some claim that the goji berry is a fountain of youth. Goji berries are very rich in nutrients – they really pack a nutritious punch. The majority of the calories come from carbohydrates, but they’re also a decent source of protein. Wolfberries have 18 different amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein that play basic but important roles in the body. They also contain 3 grams of fiber per serving, which promotes digestive health. Wolfberries are a potent source of vitamin A – just one-quarter-cup serving gives you 140 percent of your daily recommended intake of it. The same amount also gives you 20 percent of your daily vitamin C recommended intake.

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Dried apricots are a type of traditional dried fruit. Apricots have been cultivated in Central Asia since antiquity, and dried ones were an important commodity on the Silk Road. Dried apricots are an important source of carotenoids (vitamin A) and potassium. Due to their high fiber to volume ratio, they are sometimes used to relieve constipation or diarrhea. Dried apricots normally do not have any sugar added and have a very low glycemic index.

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Raisins are sweet due to their high concentration of sugars (about 30% fructose and 28% glucose by weight). They also contain about 3% protein and 3.7%–6.8% dietary fiber. Raisins are low in sodium and contain no cholesterol and rich in dietary fiber, carbohydrates with a low glycemic index, minerals, vitamins and other micronutrients. The overall nutritional value of raisins means that they are recommended for both weight control and for maintaining good human health because they help the control of glucose and cholesterol, the good functioning of the digestive system and the regulation of blood pressure. Raisins may reduce the risk for malignancies in the stomach and colon. Thus, in a balanced diet, their antioxidants can help maintain the health of the digestive system.

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Since the early 21st century within the global food industry, cranberries have been marketed as a “superfruit” due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities. Raw cranberries have moderate levels of vitamin C, dietary fiber and dietary minerals, manganese, as well as other essential micronutrients.

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Since the early 21st century within the global food industry, cranberries have been marketed as a “superfruit” due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities. Raw cranberries have moderate levels of vitamin C, dietary fiber and dietary minerals, manganese, as well as other essential micronutrients.

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The agave was a major food source for the prehistoric indigenous people of the Southwestern United States. Agave syrup is sweeter than honey and tends to be less viscous. In cooking, it is commonly used as a vegan alternative to honey for those who choose to exclude animal products from their diets.

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Honey use and production has a long and varied history. Honey collection is an ancient activity. Humans apparently began hunting for honey at least 8,000 years ago, as evidenced by a cave painting in Valencia, Spain. A mixture of sugars and other carbohydrates, honey is mainly fructose and glucose with remaining sugars including maltose, sucrose, and other complex carbohydrates.

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Dark chocolate is loaded with nutrients that can positively affect your health. Made from the seed of the cocoa tree, it is one of the best sources of antioxidants on the planet. Studies show that dark chocolate can improve health and lower the risk of heart disease. It contains a decent amount of soluble fiber and is loaded with minerals. The fatty acid profile of cocoa and dark chocolate is excellent. The fats are mostly saturated and monounsaturated, with small amounts of polyunsaturates. The bioactive compounds in dark chocolate may also be great for your skin.

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Oats are an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, several B vitamins and numerous dietary minerals, especially manganese. Oats are 66% carbohydrates, including 11% dietary fiber and 4% beta-glucans, 7% fat and 17% protein. The established property of their cholesterol-lowering effects has led to acceptance of oats as a health food. Daily consumption of oats lowers cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease.

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Wheat provides lots of calories and is an excellent source multiple essential nutrients, such as protein, dietary fiber, manganese, phosphorus and niacin. Several B vitamins and other dietary minerals are in significant content. Wheat is 13% water, 71% carbohydrates, 1.5% fat and 13% protein. Wheat is the world’s most favoured staple food. Wheat is the most important source of carbohydrate in a majority of countries.

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Barley is one of the oldest consumed grains in the world. It is a wonderfully versatile cereal grain with a rich nutlike flavour and an appealing chewy, pasta-like consistency. Barley is a rich source of essential nutrients, including protein, selenium, copper, chromium, dietary fiber, B vitamins, niacin and vitamin B6, as well as such dietary minerals, as calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and zinc. Barley is 78% carbohydrates, 1% fat, 10% protein and 10% water.

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Oats are an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, several B vitamins and numerous dietary minerals, especially manganese. Oats are 66% carbohydrates, including 11% dietary fiber and 4% beta-glucans, 7% fat and 17% protein. The established property of their cholesterol-lowering effects has led to acceptance of oats as a health food. Daily consumption of oats lowers cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease.

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Buckwheat was domesticated and first cultivated in inland Southeast Asia, possibly around 6000 BC, and from there spread to Central Asia and Tibet, and then to the Middle East and Europe. Buckwheat is a rich source of protein, dietary fiber, four B vitamins and several dietary minerals, with content especially high in niacin, magnesium, manganese and phosphorus. Buckwheat is 72% carbohydrates, including 10% dietary fiber, 3% fat and 13% protein.

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Rye is a good source of fiber, which is richly endowed with noncellulose polysaccharides, which have exceptionally high water-binding capacity and quickly give a feeling a fullness and satiety, making rye a real help for anyone trying to lose weight. Rye is high in gliadin and low in glutenin. A very good source of phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamin B1, a great characteristic of rye is that is has a 4:1 ratio of magnesium to calcium. Rye has the ability to encourage the production of butyric acid, a fatty acid required for a healthy colon. Studies also show that butyric acids can cause cancer cells to turn into normal cells.

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Milk chocolate is not only good for your heart – it also boosts your brain, your libido and even your figure. This sweet ingredient is something of a superfood, with effects ranging from boosting memory to hydrating skin. As shown by some studies, people, who consume milk chocolate daily, are 11 per cent less likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems. Milk chocolate also: boots brain function, slows signs of ageing, fights colds, stops tooth decay, lowers blood pressure, reduces stress, makes you smarter, keeps you slim, thickens hair, improves fitness, prevents anaemia, helps fight cancer, improves digestion and keeps you euphoric.

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Cinnamon has been known from remote antiquity. It was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 BC. Cinnamon was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was regarded as a gift fit for monarchs and even for a god. Cinnamon has a long history of use in traditional medicine. Cinnamon contains some fat, carbohydrates and protein.

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